School Concerns

Children who are treated for hip dysplasia in infancy typically do not need braces, casts, or crutches when they are old enough to go to school. If you have an older child in treatment for hip dysplasia, discuss your child’s needs with the school. Your child’s doctor can provide medical documentation to help with this.

Public and (some) private schools offer medical support for children who have special medical needs, such as casts, braces, or crutches. Many schools have nurses or health aids at the school who can assist your child in the classroom and will help with mobility.

What educational programs are available if my child is unable to attend school for an extended period of time?

School districts have special programs that allow children to learn at home. These programs, called Hospital/Homebound Instruction require that the child meet certain eligibility criteria. This criteria includes being confined to home, a hospital, or a healthcare facility for medical reasons preventing normal school attendance for an extended period of time.

These programs differ from state to state and differ depending on the school district. To apply for Hospital/Homebound Instruction, contact your child’s school for the correct procedure and paperwork. Your child’s doctor can provide the school with the medical documentation needed. Your child’s school will determine whether Hospital/Homebound Instruction is the best education choice for your child.

What are the Physical Education (P.E.) requirements set by schools for older children?

These requirements depend on your school district and the age of the child. Elementary age students have less P.E. requirements than middle or high-school students. P.E. participation in the upper grades can affect a student’s overall school performance and requirements for graduation.

Let your child do whatever they can but don’t hold it against them if they can’t. Most children with hip dysplasia need some restriction immediately after surgery, but generally will not need any restrictions and will be allowed to participate in physical activity as they feel they are able.


Back to Treatment Tips for Parents

  • Call to Action Buttons

  • Email Sign Up

    Email Sign Up
  • Social Media Links

  • Translate Link

    Para ver en Español Click Aquí

  • SubNav Menu

  • Latest News

    Latest News

    Submit a Story

    Book Review - by Betsy Miller

    Aug 13

    Betsy Miller IHDI Advisory Committee Author of The Parents’ Gu...

    Life with a Pavlik Harness

    Aug 13

    Natalie Trice is a UK based hip dysplasia advocate, author, member...

    Donations in Action

    Jul 30

    The International Hip Dysplasia Institute is focused on improving the ...

  • Latest Stories

    Latest Stories

    Submit a Story

    Lee

    Aug 15

    I was diagnosed with hip dysplasia at the age of 31, I was a semi pro ...

    Patricia

    Aug 05

    Born in 1961, my Bilateral Hip Dysplasia was not diagnosed until age 1...

    Sienna Rose Jacques

    Jul 29

    Sienna Story Siennas hip dysplasia wasn’t picked it up at birth. It...